Most common job interview questions and best answers

Most common job interview questions and best answers

The interview is a great challenge for every applicant. The good news: you can prepare! We have put together the most frequently asked questions with the right answers for you. Strengths and weaknesses, plans, and the best arguments that speak for you: We have the most frequently asked questions and the best answers for your job interview.

Question 1: What are your strengths and weaknesses?
Possible strengths:

Determination, ambition, ability to work in a team, organizational skills, loyalty, communication skills, willingness to talk, flexibility, critical ability, assertiveness, adaptability, quick familiarization time.

Possible weaknesses:

Impatience, over-punctuality, stubbornness, obsession with detail, meticulous working methods, perfectionism, lack of practical experience, speaking badly in front of people, badly saying “no”.

When listing the strengths, it is important to substantiate them with short examples from previous professional experience or private engagement. The weaknesses should be presented in such a way that they can in turn be interpreted as strengths. For example, if you say that you occasionally tackle too many tasks at once, it shows that you are working very diligently and motivated.

Question 2: Why did you choose our company?

Answer:

A very popular question in which the applicant can indirectly show how well they have informed themselves about the company. Here you shouldn’t simply answer that the job advertisement was an ideal match for your search profile. Go better into the company’s products and services and show that you are familiar with the company’s philosophy and key figures. You have to be able to identify with the company. If you have specific questions, you can show your interest at this point.

Similar questions:

  • “What do you expect from the position and our company?”
  • “Why did you just apply to us?”
  • “What do you know about our company?”
  • “Do you know some of our products?”

Question 3: Why should we choose you?

Answer:

This question is not only about your personality, but above all about your professional qualifications. As a career starter, you can report on your studies and your previous work and internship experience. Address the main areas of study and core tasks. Point out special knowledge (foreign languages, IT) to your interlocutor that is relevant for the vacant position.

Similar questions:

  • “What makes you different from other applicants?”
  • “What technical knowledge do you have?”
  • “Where have you been successful in your previous professional activities?”

Question 4: Where do you see yourself in five years?

Answer:

Every company has to invest in a new employee. So the person you are talking to would like to know whether it is worthwhile to familiarize yourself with the company’s secrets. A strategically wise answer indicates that you would like to develop yourself professionally and personally and take on more responsibility, in the current company. But don’t immediately say that you would like to be the person you’re talking to in five years.

Similar questions:

  • “Where do you see yourself in the future?”
  • “What do you want to achieve professionally?”
  • “How long do you want to stay with us?”

Question 5: Why did you study for so long?

Answer:

A typical stress question where you have to show how you react under pressure. In every resume, you will find one or the other point at which something can be abandoned, be it bad grades, idle times, or a long course of study. Stay calm and justify objectively. For example, you can say that you financed your studies yourself. As a result, you were able to gain specific work experience parallel to your studies.

Similar questions:

  • “What did you do from… to…?”
  • “Why do you have such bad grades in…?”

Question 6: Can you take responsibility?

Answer:

Every employee has to take responsibility. This question goes one step further in terms of leadership skills. If you say that you are very good at taking responsibility, you should justify that too. Even without professional experience, you will surely find a private example that can be brought in here. However, you shouldn’t be too dominant, but also emphasize that you can subordinate yourself just as well. After all, you are sitting across from your future boss.

Similar questions:

  • “Have you ever organized something?”
  • “What role do you play within a team?”

Question 7: What are your salary expectations?

Answer:

Every employee costs money. So the employer wants to find out whether he can afford you, but also whether you are aware of your performance options. Too high demand is a deterrent. If you make the salary too small, you may be judged on it in the following negotiation. If you already have work experience, you can use your last salary as a guide. But also explain that you are not only interested in the salary, but also in the added value that the position has to offer you.

Similar questions:

  • “What would you like to earn in the future?”
  • “Are you concerned about your salary or the challenge?”

Question 8: Have you also applied to other companies?

Answer:

It is clear to every employer that you have not just sent an application. Nevertheless, your interlocutor would like to find out with this question whether you are applying for the position specifically and with serious interest. So if you still have other open applications, you can report them calmly, but these should not be about opposing positions or companies. The hint can also signal to the employer that he has to decide quickly if he wants to hire you. Unsuccessful application attempts should not be mentioned.

Similar questions:

  • “Are there other companies that you would like to work for ?”

Question 9: Would you like children?

Answer:

Your employer shouldn’t ask you this question. Therefore, you don’t have to answer them truthfully. The best thing to do is to say something like “To be honest, I haven’t thought about it at all. Certainly not in the next few years.”

Similar questions:

  • “Do you belong to a political party?”
  • “Do you have any health problems?”

Question 10: Do you have any questions?

Answer:

A harmless question at the end? Not correct. You should now slip into the role of the interviewer. Here the person you are talking to can test again how well you are informed about the company and whether you have listened carefully to the conversation. So don’t ask questions that you already know the answer to. Good questions relate to the position to be filled or possible further training opportunities. Under no circumstances should you ask about your vacation days and working hours, as this suggests that you are interested in the holiday or vacations.